Discover the hidden parts of Thailand

Thailand is more than Bangkok, Pattaya, Phuket and Chiang Mai. There are an excellent many fascinating isolated locations that routine visitors enjoy and understand, which you might like to think about adding to your itinerary when you’re planning your next trip to Thailand.

Your next itinerary

About 260 km outside Bangkok, the ancient city of Nakhon Ratchasima, likewise known by its historical name of Khorat, is well-known for its numerous heritage websites that expose the roots of traditional Thai culture. Once the entrance to the country’s northeast, the city was a major center of the huge and influential Khmer kingdom, which stretched across much of Southeast Asia, in between the 9th and 15th centuries. Life moves at a more regressed speed here, compared to the primary tourist centers. Simply south of Nakhon Ratchasima, in a lavish river valley, is the wonderful market town of Dan Kwain, popular for the great quality of its ceramics and distinguished by the uniqueness of its products.

Near Nakhon Ratchasima, there are dense forests, mountains, and rivers with magnificent waterfalls. Khao Yai National Park, listed as a World Heritage site in 2005, undulates over stunning mountain varies blanketed by thick forests, and plunges down deep valleys with wild river courses.

The quiet riverside town of Kanchanaburi, about 130 km west of Bangkok, is another place where you can explore more of Thailand’s historical and natural treasures. Kanchanaburi lies next to the Kwai River, where the famous World War II bridge still stands (the topic of an Oscar-winning film, The Bridge Over the River Kwai). The trek through the steamy undergrowth, to the stunning seven-tiered Erewan Waterfalls, is well worth the effort.

Heading north

North of Chiang Mai, in the jungle wilderness, is Thailand’s greatest mountain, Doi Inthanon. Here you’ll discover the prized red and white ranges of rhododendron, as well as more than 350 bird species, more than in any other place in Thailand.

Sukhothai, Thailand’s first administrative and cultural capital, established in 1257, is today a group of well-preserved ruins. During its 120-year golden duration, the old city was known for its stunning temples, statues and gardens, and is now a considerable historical centerpiece. The site is well worth the brief drive out of the existing city of Sukhothai, about 400 km north of Bangkok.

The quiet riverside town of Kanchanaburi, about 130 km west of Bangkok, is another place where you can check out more of Thailand’s natural and historical treasures. North of Chiang Mai, in the jungle wilderness, is Thailand’s highest mountain, Doi Inthanon. Here you’ll find the prized red and white ranges of rhododendron, as well as more than 350 bird species, more than in any other area in Thailand.

Sukhothai, Thailand’s first administrative and cultural capital, established in 1257, is today a group of unspoiled ruins. So if your stay is long or short Thailand offers some hidden spots that might not be so easily found in the tourist guide you find at a book store. The hidden gems mentioned here are from first hand accounts of expats going off the most visited paths and discovering something new. If you found this information helpful and are interested in staying here long term, then consider some of the services that our site offers (Click here).

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